“I’ve Got It All” (2000)
Ink-jet print

” It’s Not the Way I Want to Die” (2005)
Reclaimed timber and metal

“My Bed Work” (1998)
Matress, linens, pillows, various objects

“My Bed Work” (1998)
Matress, linens, pillows, various objects

“My Bed Work” (1998)
Matress, linens, pillows, various objects

“Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-1995” (1995)
Appliqued tent, mattress and light

“Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1962-1995” (1995)
Appliqued tent, mattress and light

“Exorcism of the last painting I ever made” (1996)
14 paintings, 78 drawings, 5 body prints, various painted and personal items, furniture, CDs, newspapers, magazines, kitchen and food supplies

“Exorcism of the last painting I ever made” (1996)
14 paintings, 78 drawings, 5 body prints, various painted and personal items, furniture, CDs, newspapers, magazines, kitchen and food supplies

“Those who suffer Love” (2009)
Neon light

Tracey Emin was born in England and became a professor of confessional art at a European graduate school. She has been one of the leading british artists since the 1990’s. Emin is widely known for her openness. Her work includes sexually explicit drawings and paintings, personal insights, passionate romance, love and relations to feminism. She takes her artwork to another level by expanding beyond sculptures or paintings and incorporates light  and sexually provocative messages. I particularly like Emin because her work is all about women–exalting, describing, explaining and trying to predict them. What makes her work more interesting is that she incorporates her own experiences and characteristics.  At first glance, I thought she was just some lady who was all about sex but after looking at  more of her work, I felt like I somewhat understood who she was as a person and some of the things she’s been through. She has a unexpected way of connecting with the viewer. For example, in her sculpture “Exorcism of the last painting I ever made,” Emin creates many smaller pieces of art that symbolize who she is to create a bigger picture of herself. One of the smaller pieces that stood out to me was a drawing of two people having sex and a caption below saying “if I have to be honest, I’d rather not be painting.” I thought she really revealed her personal and sexual side by proclaiming that even though she’s an artist, she’s also a woman who’s sure of herself and that there’s more to her than her work.

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