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A Time to Keep

Algorithmic installation, Dallas, 2011

Oil and ink on linen, sound
Music by Bryce Dessner
Algorithmic arrangement by Matthew Ritchie

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Ghost Operator

Installations: White Cube Gallery, London, 2008
Navigator, Albright-Knox Museum, New York, 2011

tar, shotgun shells, acrylic tarot cards, acrylic and marker on wall, photographic prints, RFID chips

Images:
Installation views; White Cube, London, 2008

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Installations: Sao Paulo Biennal, 2003
‘Remote Viewing’, Whitney Museum of Art, New York 2005
St Louis Museum of Art, 2006

Images:
‘Remote Viewing’, Whitney Museum of Art, New York
Sao Paulo Biennal, 2003
Private Collection, New York

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Games of Chance and Skill

Permanent architectural installation
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2002

Aluminum, epoxy, etched glass, photographic prints, fluorescent lights

Images:
Installation views, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2002

Link:
Website commissioned for Games of Chance & Skill, 2002

Matthew Ritchie’s art revolves around a personal mythology drawn from creation myths, particle physics, thermodynamics, and games of chance, among other elements. His artistic mission has been no less ambitious than an attempt to represent the entire universe and the structures of knowledge and belief that we use to understand and visualize it. Ritchie’s encyclopedic project (continually expanding and evolving, like the universe itself) stems from his imagination, and is catalogued in a conceptual chart replete with allusions drawn from Judeo-Christian religion, occult practices, Gnostic traditions, and scientific elements and principles. Ritchie’s work deals explicitly with the idea of information being “on the surface,” and information is also the subject of his work. Although often described as a painter, Ritchie creates works on paper, prints, light-box drawings, floor-to-wall installations, freestanding sculpture, websites, and short stories, which tie his sprawling works together into a narrative structure. Drawing is central to his work. He scans his drawings into the computer so that images can be enlarged, taken apart, made smaller or three-dimensional, reshaped, transformed into digital games, or given to someone else to execute. One ongoing work that Ritchie calls “an endless drawing” contains everything he has drawn before.

Sources:

http://www.matthewritchie.com/

http://www.re-title.com/artists/Matthew-Ritchie.asp

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthew_Ritchie

http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/matthew-ritchie

Ch 4. Time

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